Join the Everybody Loves Italian Newsletter Today

Fun and Exciting Updates and Information From Your Friends Dominic & Frank

Subscribe!

We Promise! We will not spam you and we'll keep your personal data secure.

How to make Homemade Ricotta – Ciao Italia

How to make Homemade Ricotta – Ciao Italia

Ricotta is an Italian whey cheese made from sheep (or cow, goat, or Italian water buffalo) milk whey left over from the production of cheese. Like other whey cheeses, it is made by coagulating the proteins that remain after the casein has been used to make cheese, notably albumin and globulin.

Ricotta (literally meaning “recooked”) protein can be harvested if the whey is first allowed to become more acidic by additional fermentation. Then the acidified whey is heated to near boiling. The combination of low pH and high temperature denatures the protein and causes it to precipitate, forming a fine curd. Once cooled, the curd is separated by passing through a fine cloth.

Ricotta curds are creamy white in appearance, and slightly sweet in taste. The fat content changes depending on the brand and the type of milk used. In this form, it is somewhat similar in texture to some cottage cheese variants, though considerably lighter. It is highly perishable. However, ricotta also comes in aged varieties which are preservable for much longer.

The production of ricotta in the Italian peninsula is old, dating back to the Bronze Age. In the second millennium BC ceramic vessels called milk boilers started to appear frequently and were apparently unique to the peninsula. These were designed to boil milk at high temperatures and prevent the milk from boiling over. The fresh acid-coagulated cheeses produced with these boilers were probably made with whole milk. However, the production of rennet-coagulated cheese overtook the production of fresh whole milk cheeses during the first millennium BC. Bronze cheese graters found in the graves of the Etruscan elite prove that hard grating cheeses were popular with the aristocracy. Cheese graters were also commonly used in ancient Roman kitchens. Unlike the fresh acid-coagulated cheese, aged rennet-coagulated cheese could be preserved for much longer.

Ceramic milk boilers were still used by Apennine shepherds to make ricotta in the 19th century AD. Today metal milk boilers are used, but production methods have changed little since ancient times.

From Wikipedia

From You Tube

Dominic and Frank forever Celebrating Life, Love and the Italian Experience

Click here to visit our webpage Everybody Loves Italian

No comments yet... Be the first to leave a reply!

Leave a Reply